What is a scramble in golf

When watching the British Open live golf streaming feeds this month, there may be questions that arise like this one. What is a scramble in golf? We have the information on this question.

scramble in golf

In golf stats, scrambling is defined as the percent of the time a player misses the green in regulation, but still makes par or better.

Some examples of this are as follows: If a player plays a par-3 hole and misses the green on the tee shot. The player chips up and makes the putt. This is a successful scramble play.

If a player plays a par-3 hole and misses the green on the tee shot. Then the player chips up and misses the putt, this is an unsuccessful scramble.

When a player plays a par-4 hole and hits the tee shot behind a tree and needs to chip out sideways. This results in a missed green in regulation. Then the player hits the third shot onto the green and makes the putt. This is a successful scramble play.

If the player hits the first tee shot out of bounds. The player misses the green on the next shot but chips up and makes a putt. Although this is what is generally known as an up and down, it isn’t a successful scramble. The player did not make par or better.

There are pros and cons to these. The pros are that this is a way to measure the player’s abilities to make par when the green is missed in regulation.

There are several cons. It is a stat that only measures whether or not the criteria for a successful scramble are satisfied or not. It can only look at ups and downs when the score is par or better. Also, the up and down can be from anywhere, as long as a golfer makes par or better after missing the green in regulation. It is very difficult to know what the stats means and measure.

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